Category PreTeens

Teeth issues for pre-teens: 9-11 years
PreTeens

Teeth issues for pre-teens: 9-11 years

Teeth-grinding Occasional teeth-grinding or clenching that isn't causing your child any problems doesn't need treatment. But if the grinding keeps going, you might want to talk to a dentist - it could lead to your child experiencing headaches, tooth pain or jaw pain, or wearing down her teeth. Devices to protect teeth from grinding can help.

Read More
PreTeens

Using attention to improve behaviour

Attention and your child's behaviour Your attention is a big reward for your child. If your child behaves in a particular way and gets your attention, she's likely to behave that way again. When you give attention for good behaviour , it shows your child that behaving in a way that you like will get positive interest.
Read More
PreTeens

Pre-teen development: what to expect

Physical changes in pre-teens For girls , you might start to see early physical changes from about 10-11 years - but this can happen as young as 8, or as old as 13. Physical changes in puberty include: breast development changes in body shape and height growth of pubic and body hair the start of periods.
Read More
PreTeens

Pre-teen communicating and relationships: overview

Family relationships in the pre-teen years Family relationships change during adolescence, but they tend to stay strong right through these years. In fact, your child needs your family's love and support as much as she did when she was younger. At the same time, your child will want more privacy and more personal space as he gets older.
Read More
PreTeens

Sex education and talking with children about sex: 9-11 years

Talking about sex and sexuality with children: 9-11 years It's never too early to talk with your child about sex. Talking about sex, sexuality and bodies as your child moves towards puberty can help your child understand that sex and sexuality are typical, healthy parts of life. Open and honest conversations when your child is young can make later conversations easier .
Read More
PreTeens

Pre-teen behaviour and how to manage it

Pre-teens behaviour: what to expect and why As part of growing up and becoming more independent, your child needs to test out independent ideas and ways of behaving. Sometimes this involves disagreeing with you, giving you a bit of 'attitude', pushing the limits and boundaries you set, wanting to be more like friends and even taking risks.
Read More
PreTeens

Internet safety: children 9-11 years

Why internet safety matters Children aged 9-11 years often have their own devices, which they use to go online by themselves. They use digital media and the internet for doing schoolwork and homework, playing games, listening to or downloading music, and general browsing. They might be communicating with other people through in-game chat and other social media.
Read More
PreTeens

Dental care for pre-teens: 9-11 years

Teeth development From 6-12 years, children have a mixture of adult and baby teeth. By the age of 12, most children have all their adult teeth except for their third molars (wisdom teeth). There are 32 adult teeth. When adult teeth are coming through: some tips Your child might find chewing is more difficult when her teeth are loose or missing, but she still needs to eat healthy foods.
Read More
PreTeens

Using screen time to encourage physical activity: 3-11 years

Screen time and physical activity Getting up and moving around is important for your child's energy levels, development, sleep, and overall health and wellbeing. Sometimes screen time and screen use can mean children sit still for too long without a break. But it doesn't have to be this way - you can use screen time to get your child moving .
Read More
PreTeens

Eating disorders in older children and teenagers

What are eating disorders and disordered eating? Eating disorders are serious mental illnesses that also affect physical health. The most common eating disorders are: anorexia nervosa, which is when someone tries to lose more weight than is healthy and has a distorted body image bulimia nervosa, which is when someone eats very large amounts of food and then gets rid of the food - for example, by vomiting or using laxatives binge eating disorder, which is when someone eats very large amounts of food and feels distressed about their eating, but doesn't try to get rid of the food.
Read More
PreTeens

Pornography: talking about it with children 9-11 years

How pornography affects children, teenagers and young people Pornography is sexually explicit material that aims to arouse people who are looking at it. For children aged 9-11 years, pornography can be confusing and upsetting . Also, pornography can send negative messages like: mutual consent and safe sex aren't important violent sexual acts are normal and appealing loving relationships aren't important aggressive behaviour towards women is normal and OK.
Read More
PreTeens

Starting secondary school

Going to secondary school: what to expect Children often have mixed feelings about starting secondary school. They might be: excited about new friends, subjects and teachers nervous about learning new routines, making new friends or wearing a new uniform worried about handling the workload or not fitting in.
Read More
PreTeens

Learning: primary and secondary school years

How children and teenagers learn Children and teenagers learn by observing, listening, exploring, experimenting and asking questions. Being interested, motivated and engaged in learning is important for children once they start school. It can also help if they understand why they're learning something.
Read More
PreTeens

New baby: preparing your other children

Preparing for a baby: how children feel If you're having a new baby, your other children might be excited. But they'll have to learn to share your love and attention with the new baby. This can be a big step, especially if your children are still toddlers. They might feel they're being pushed out of the spotlight.
Read More
PreTeens

Talking about school

Why talking about school is hard 'How was school?' is a big question. To answer, your child has to sum up a whole day, and that's hard for children (and even adults!) to do. A child might really want to say, 'My day was so jam-packed with ideas and classes and social stuff that I don't know where to start'.
Read More
PreTeens

Learning maths at school

Learning maths: connecting school and home Learning maths doesn't begin and end in the classroom . Your child has been learning about maths since she was born. And once your child starts school, you still have a big role in helping her continue to build maths and numeracy skills. Here are some ways that you can support your child in learning maths skills at home at all ages: Ask about what maths topics your child is learning at school and talk about how maths can help with everyday activities.
Read More
PreTeens

Teeth issues for pre-teens: 9-11 years

Teeth-grinding Occasional teeth-grinding or clenching that isn't causing your child any problems doesn't need treatment. But if the grinding keeps going, you might want to talk to a dentist - it could lead to your child experiencing headaches, tooth pain or jaw pain, or wearing down her teeth. Devices to protect teeth from grinding can help.
Read More
PreTeens

School problems: helping children 9-15 years

Keeping an eye on your child's progress at school When you're know how your child is going at school, it can alert you to early signs that your child is beginning to struggle. It can also help you work out whether any existing school problems are improving or getting worse. You can get a sense of how your child is going by: talking to your child regularly about school noticing how your child talks about school - for example, if your child is complaining, reluctant to talk, or sounds bored or unmotivated about school, there might be a problem checking whether your child is doing homework regularly reading your child's school reports carefully attending parent-teacher interviews and other opportunities to meet school staff watching out for any behaviour changes or problems.
Read More
PreTeens

School problems: children 9-15 years

School problems: what to expect Ups and downs at school are part of life for many young people. A good relationship with your child's school and teachers can help you head off problems. If school problems do come up, it's important that you quickly recognise and address them. School problems can show up as poor academic performance, lack of motivation for school, loss of interest in school work, or poor relationships with peers or teachers.
Read More
PreTeens

Screen time: how it helps children learn

Screen time and learning Screen time can be good for your child's learning and development when your child: uses age-appropriate, good-quality digital media - for example, when your child plays a video game that involves critical or creative thinking and progressing to higher levels has a purpose in mind when using screens - for example, when your child goes online to find instructions for a craft activity gets new ideas for traditional play from screen use - for example, when playing Minecraft gets your child interested in designing buildings with boxes, glue and paper produces content rather than just consuming it - for example, when your child writes a blog, uses an app to create music, or films and edits short movies.
Read More
PreTeens

School selection: practical steps

Step 1: consider your child's and family's school preferences What's important in a school to you and your child - for example, academic results, music facilities or sports programs? Does your child have special language, education or other abilities or needs? What's your child's preferred or best learning style?
Read More